Why Writers Should Have YouTube Channels | Web Design Relief

by | Nov 23, 2020 | Grow Your Author Platform, Social Networking For Writers, YouTube Tips | 0 comments

Why Writers Should Have YouTube Channels | Web Design Relief

As a writer, you may think YouTube isn’t a worthwhile platform for reaching out to your readers and building an audience. Think again—your readers love to watch videos! The media experts at Web Design Relief know that YouTube has over a billion users, and it’s currently the second most popular platform after Facebook. Here are more reasons why writers should have YouTube channels.

Why More Writers Are Creating YouTube Channels

More Exposure: The more times you show up in an Internet search, the better! Along with your social media platforms and author website, having a YouTube channel helps you reach a wider audience and makes you more findable by literary agents and editors. Since YouTube is owned by Google, it also sends traffic to YouTube channels. If a potential new reader conducts an online search for your topics or writing style, Google will display your YouTube channel in the search results. Be sure to keep your content fresh and interesting so visitors to your channel choose to become subscribers! Here are innovative ways to increase your visibility on YouTube.

Better Engagement: Readers who visit your YouTube channel are actively searching for your specific type of content, so your videos will command more of their attention and generate more responses and interaction. Plus, unlike posts on social media that can be buried under other posts and lost forever, YouTube videos will always pop up in a search if the topic is relevant. Visitors who watch your videos are obviously interested in you and your writing, so asking your YouTube audience to sign up for your e-mail list or newsletter is another great way to connect and grow your fan base.

Increased Readership. If you provide quality content on a consistent basis, your regular readers will be delighted with your channel and new readers who browsed in for one topic may stay and watch your other videos. Visitors who enjoy your content and subscribe to your channel will receive notifications whenever you post new content. Viewers who watch your YouTube channel are more likely to share your content with other booklovers and literature fans, bringing you and your writing to the attention of new readers—and potential new subscribers!

Joining Is Free: There’s no cost to create your YouTube channel and start posting videos. You can build your readership, become more visible in online searches, and engage your followers without spending lots of your hard-earned cash. YouTube does offer the option to purchase ads, but it’s not necessary to pay to play.

Bonus: Once you develop a substantial following on your YouTube channel, you can choose to monetize your videos so they can generate income for you! And while making a living from YouTubing is rare, you may bring in enough money to buy that new journal you’ve had your eye on.

YouTube Videos Can Be Reused: You can take the videos you create for your YouTube channel and embed them on your author website and into blog articles, as well as feature the videos on your Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram accounts. Since videos are popular on social media platforms, you’ll capture your followers’ attention more effectively in their feeds.

A YouTube channel is a great way to connect with your audience and grow your following. And you don’t need to have expensive video equipment or expert camera skills to get started! You can read some of your published work, answer questions about your writing process, give writing tips and advice, and much more. It’s a great way to stand out and be noticed!

 

Question: Which authors do you follow on YouTube?

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